Yasu Ishida

Yasu Ishida

Yasu Ishida, Master of Fine Arts in Theatre for Young Audiences, is an award-winning magician, director and storyteller. He beautifully imbues the essence of traditional Japanese culture into his magic and storytelling. Yasu has enthralled audiences all over the United States, including

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Origami Workshop

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Program description

*Virtual Program Option is available. Yasu has been working with 55 schools and libraries in more than 8 states for young audiences this summer. (https://youtu.be/a2A2yvLCqeY)

Yasu’s Origami workshop enhances global understanding of culture through art of paper folding. At the beginning of the class, Yasu will do a short presentation of stories using Origami as storytelling tools. And then

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Booking / scheduling contact

Program Detail

Program type: Virtual/Online Program, Workshop
Artistic Discipline: Literary Arts, Multi-discipline, Storytelling, Theater, Visual Arts
Cultural Origin: Asian
Subject: History, Language Arts, Literacy, Math, Social Studies / History, Theatre Arts, Visual Arts
Population served: Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3, Grade 4, Grade 5, Grade 6, Grade 7, Grade 8
Bilingual: Yes
Available dates:

All year around

Location(s):

Class room, art room, or library

Fees / Ticketing:

$1250 for one day flat fee, can teach 4-5 classes, can add performances with $300 more. Fee includes origami papers.

EDUCATION STANDARDS

NC Standard Course of Study:

SL2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually, quantitatively, and orally. In my workshop, I demonstrate Story-gami, which Is
telling a story as a paper’s shape changes as the story goes. For students, they get to learn
how to integrate information orally and visually and connect them.

SL.2.4 Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive
details, speaking audibly in coherent and complete sentences. Students can learn through
my Story-gami, how to develop and apply their storytelling skills at home and also their
classroom.

NC.3.G.1 Identify the attributes of two dimensional shapes (circle, square, rectangle,
triangle, oval, rhombus). In learning Story-gami’s shapes, students get to learn
characteristics and attributes of two dimensional shapes

NC Essential Standards:

From World Languages:
NL.CLL.3.1 Use single words and simple, memorized phrases in presentations to identify the
names of people, places, and things. I teach Japanese words in the classroom when I
introduce Origami and meaning behind of the construction of the word. For example, Ori-fold
and Gami-paper.

From Social Studies
2.G.1.2 Interpret the meaning of symbols and the location of physical and human features
on a map (cities, railroads, highways, countries, continents, oceans, etc.), When I introduce
where Origami culture came from, I talk about Asian continent on map and globe and how
geography plays an important role in culture forming and passing it through geography
locations.

From Arts Education Standards,
2.CX.1.1
Exemplify visual arts representing the heritage, customs, and traditions of various cultures.
Students learn how Origami is connected to Japanese culture.

Supporting Materials

Qualifications

Conducts educational programming for 2 or more years: Yes
Maintains general liability insurance (Individuals and organizations listed in this Directory can provide proof of insurance upon request. ASC does not hold copies of current documentation for providers): Yes
Three letters of recommendation / references available: Yes
Provides study guides for teachers and or students: Yes
Connects to State and or Common Core Curriculum Standards: Yes
Conducts ongoing assessments of program quality: Yes

PHOTOS

VIDEOS

References

“Yasu Ishida is one of the most creative and prolific storytellers working in the field today. I
recommend him without hesitation.”

– Eric Chang, Art Program Coordinator, East West Center

Cancellation Policy

If a program is cancelled because of inclement weather. It will be rescheduled for a mutually agreeable future date. And if the show is cancelled after the contract has been signed, the artist requires 50% of the fee.